Tomorrow evening I’m doing a presentation and discussion to Collaborate for Change ( twitter hashtag #c84c)

I ran a table discussion at the last c84c at BETT last January (you can see the video at the bottom of this blog post) on “How can we encourage teachers to take risks and innovate with technology”. The discussion was great and the whole event was also fantastic bringing together a massive range of people to discuss and present.

The second C84C takes place in Havering, Essex which was a little hard for me to get to, not because I’m one of those Londoners scared of venturing to Essex but because I recently moved to Norway. Fortunately the organisers of C84C agreed to let me run a session virtually which I will be doing via the wonders of blackboard collaborate (formerly Elluminate).  It’s a piece of software that has evolved quite well since I first tried it during my MA 4 years ago or so and is great for teaching. I used it earlier this year for a series of webinars for a group of students I worked with on a leadership programme and got to experiment with it and work out how to make online sessions participatory and interesting. Tomorrow though is a new challenge as I will be presenting and attempting to lead a discussion to a room of people as well as, I hope, some online participants. All being we will have a great discussion but I also want to learn some new tricks for presenting virtually to a room of people and the best way is by doing, which takes me back to the title of this post…

The topic we will be discussing is,

“Is there such a thing as too much innovation?”

The focus will be on looking at why existing innovators innovate, whether there are boundaries or appropriate times to innovate and if we need to plan carefully for innovation or just do it.

Comments are very welcome below but even more welcome if you wish to join us tomorrow – the link to participate online and to replay is https://sas.elluminate.com/site/external/launch/meeting.jnlp?sid=2010108&password=M.B282631F6F3D88D3A505A51183E1A4

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