Facebook Stats in 2010

Posted on December 31st, 2010 in thoughts | No Comments »

A number of places on the web have posted some fascinating Facebook stats of activity in 2010 – I can’t work out where the original source is but will post some references at the end.

They quote that in 2010 in a randomly sampled 20 minute time slot there were (in order)

  • Comments: 10,208,000
  • Likes: 7,657,000
  • Messages: 4,632,000
  • Photos uploaded: 2,716,000
  • Friend requests accepted: 1,972,000
  • Status updates: 1,851,000
  • Wall posts: 1,587,000
  • Event invites sent out: 1,484,000
  • Tagged photos: 1,323,000
  • Shared links: 1,000,000

I assume they are all rounded to the nearest 1000 or it would be quite a coincidence.

They also claim that in 2010 the following changes were made to relationship statuses

  • 43,869,800 changed to single
  • 36,774,801 changes to married
  • 28,460,516 changed to in a relationship
  • 5,974,574 changed to engaged
  • 3,025,791 changed to “it’s complicated”

Of course these statistics don’t really tell you much except that Facebook is pretty enormous and heavily used and that it’s pretty easy to get statistics from it.

A week ago Facebook posted this video about the top trends on Facebook in 2010, over 6000 people have liked it so far so it’s probably worth a watch!

References:
I first came across this story from http://rorycellan.posterous.com/those-facebook-stats-for-2010 the posterous blog of BBC Tech Correspondant Rory Cellan Jones via a linked in message.

Trying to find the source I came across posts by Democracy UK http://www.facebook.com/notes/democracy-uk-on-facebook/a-snapshot-of-facebook-in-2010/172769082761603 and Mashable http://mashable.com/2010/12/31/facebook-by-the-numbers-in-2010-stats/ who also put the link in to the video.

Edit – this Facebook blog post also explains the top status trends of the year http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=466369142130

Wishing all readers a great New Year.

My day at Limmud Conference

Every day at Limmud is different, no doubt I’ve included too much information in this blog post but I wanted to give a full picture of what this conference is actually about. It does miss out all the important little conversations in between sessions, over meals and to the people you are sitting next to, many of whom are complete strangers. Such is Limmud

Breakfast

11-12.10 – Sat in the AV room at the back of RAM 1 with Charles Darwish and Jonathan Hunter streaming the session on the internet – chatting to people online about the session and tweeting about it.

12.30-13:40 – Sat in the same AV room streaming and listening to John Ging of UNRWA in conversation with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg, fascinating.

14:00-15:10 – Sat on the panel of a discussion on “Long Term Prospects for Israel’s Democracy” – really enjoyed discussing the topic with Jpost journalist Yaakov Lapin, Acri (Israel Civil Rights Movement) worker Libby Lenkinski Friedlander and was a real pleasure have the session chaired by journalist and former editor of The Jewish Chronicle Ned Temko, who I’ve been a fan of for a long time. Questions from the floor were brilliantly thought out and very challenging. A great discussion I hope we didn’t disappoint people by not arguing too much!

15:30 – 16:40 – Listened to a discussion on new models for Jewish Communities for the 21st Century. Interesting though more focused on creating communities based around prayer than I had expected.

17:00 – took a coffee break for an hour and chatted to a Dane a Norwegian and two English francophiles!

18:00 – quick dinner, quite nice!

18:30-19:40 – Ran a networking session for Jewish teachers. Was lovely to arrive to an already formed chatty circle of teachers of all ages and areas of expertise, many trainees. There are so many Jewish people working in education and so many are keen to share experiences and resources. www.jewishteachers.org.uk

20:00 – Sat by a Christmas tree and watched football on my laptop, not very sociable of me, best not to say anymore

22:00-23:30 – Attended a very fun and funny session on cocktail making. The most patient presenter, a London bar manager, did a great job.

23:30 until late – sat in the open mic cafe (the acoustic cafe) and listened to some fantastic and a few bizarre performances finishing in a great jam session.

Today has already been very different…

Once again this year I am attending Limmud Conference at Warwick University and again I am giving a number of sessions. (More about Limmud conference later on).

One of my sessions it titled e-Tools, e-Learning, and e-Communication for e-veryone happening at 19:00-20:10 GMT on Tuesday (28th December)

In this session I will be presenting various online tools and case studies to give people ideas on how to use e-tools for learning, teaching, networking and communicating.

I would love to get some participation from people online, live on the night or via this voicethread. If you have a tool you could talk about or a case study to share please let me know by adding your name to this Google Doc.

I will be broadcasting the session via Flashmeeting so all can join in

If you want to contribute but can’t make it live on the evening please leave us a comment on this voicethread.

Nb in case you are wondering, like all the presenters at Limmud I am volunteering to be there, and like most of the presenters I am a paying participant!

About Limmud Conference: Limmud conference is an annual conference of Jewish learning which attracts about 2500 people. It attracts an incredibly diverse range of people with sessions on anything and everything. You can view the full conference programme on their website.

Back in January when the UK shut down for a week because of snow schools leaders suddenly realised that VLEs and e-learning could be a solution to closed schools. Maybe the promise of virtual classrooms and 24 hour learning could actually keep school children learning when schools were closed.

With this in mind, alongside the prospect of further school closures, I started an open Google Document allowing teachers to share websites and ideas useful for student self learning. These aren’t necessarily alternatives to the classroom but links to share with a class when an unplanned closure hits.

I apologise it’s taken so long to share all the links. I was reminded of this long forgotten document by the snow outside my window and the UK school closures again this December.

You can view the ideas and links here
https://docs.google.com/View?id=dhnhtkkp_179chpjhjfh

Thanks to all who contributed, there are a list of names at the bottom of the document but there were many other contributors who contributed anonymously.

If anyone would like to contribute further links and ideas please message via twitter or leave a comment and I will send you the link to the document.

As well as the document I experimented teaching two 6th form classes online during the school closure. I’ll blog about this experience another time.

Certainly in the UK, and I know in many other countries we have problems getting girls and boys to study some subjects. As a Computer Science undergraduate at Edinburgh and Birmingham Universities it was hard not to notice the ratio of boys to girls, I would estimate at least 80% boys when I studied 10 years ago. Similar gender imbalances are common in subjects like physics, science in general and I know conversely some subjects struggle to recruit boys.

As a teacher I was always impressed by the efforts made by individual teachers to get a variety of students to take their subject. During one school fire drill, with all the kids streaming onto the field, it was unusual but great to see a boys PE class come out of the dance studio while a girls group were playing touch rugby on the field. Many national organisations have taken this up and I know in the world of ICT and Computing teaching E-skills UK were one group to take on the challenge especially with their creative CC4G programme which I led for 2 years in my own school.

Two recent events have reminded me of the problem of getting girls into certain fields.

First was the Royal Society’s Call for evidence on Computing in Schools. I made some small contributions to the Mirandanet response to this and received a copy of the BCS and Computing at School’s group response, (Computing at School CAS is a fantastic organisation that works to promote computing in UK schools). The CAS response showed the numbers of students taking Computing at A-level taken from the JCQ (Joint Council for Qualifications) website. I was astonished to learn that last year only 278 girls took A2 computing in whole of England. I taught 3 of them so actually taught over 1% of girls A2 Computing in 2009/2010. All rather depressing. But at least lots of good people are doing good things to try to slowly redress the balance.

That was the first shock I had, the second was a little more surprising. On a bored Sunday Tube (London Underground) journey I picked up a copy of the Toys R Us catalogue sitting on the seat next to me and had a flick through. I promise you I’m not a serial reader of children’s toy catalogues! I was rather surprised with some of the items they were selling and the pictures of each gender child next to the items.

First up the telescopes and sciencey toys

Science Toys

Boys like telescopes


As you can see it’s the boys who are enjoying playing with the telescopes though there is a girl enjoying an anatomy toy. Strike 1 for promoting physics to boys and not girls.

So let’s move to the next photo

Girls with shopping sweeping and ironing toys

Girls with shopping sweeping and ironing toys


Yes that’s right, the girls are not just playing with their ice-cream makers but shopping, sweeping and ironing. Hmm this is getting a little 1950s stereotypical now but it’s all innocent isn’t it. So let’s check on the next page.

Boy with DIY girl with the Cooking

Boy with DIY girl with the Cooking

When I saw these I had to look again, no not at the rather weird thought that a parent may buy their child a toy McDonalds kitchen, but by the other sterotypes. The boy doing his DIY, the girl playing in the kitchen. But wait what’s that in the bottom photo? Is it…

Girl serving boy a burger

Girl serving boy his dinner

…yes a little girl serving food to the little boy, how delightful.

I worry science and ICT teachers are fighting a losing battle.